Could wing mirrors ever be removed from UK cars?

Historic move by Japan

Japan has historically approved a law allowing rear facing cameras to replace wing mirrors on cars.

Currently the only country to have passed such a law, the move could open up the prospect of others considering a change, including the UK.

Since 1978, it’s been the law that all cars sold in the UK must have at least one internal and one external mirror. Technology has developed significantly since then and represents a viable and safe alternative.

Rear-view mirrors on cars date back to 1909, when a woman named Dorothy Levitt suggested using a long-handled mirror to check behind you in her book, ‘The Woman and the Car’. Modern mirrors have advanced significantly since then, commonly offering electric movement and heating.

The type of rear camera lined up to replace mirrors in Japanese cars feature 360 degree visibility, meaning no blind spots and assisting with regular actions such as parking and manoeuvring.

It also removes the prospect of vehicle damage from careless drivers and reason for drivers to turn behind them to look.

However, as with any technology a risk could be a malfunction which could completely remove rear vision until fixed, presenting a considerable hazard.

If the technology improves, and can be proven to work consistently and safely, then there’s little to argue against a potential change in the UK law in the future
Japan has historically approved a law allowing rear facing cameras to replace wing mirrors on cars